An Introduction to 1v1 Commander

1v1 Commander is a relatively new format originally introduced last year on Magic Online. The format is built on interesting decks and allows you to play with many different cards from Magic’s past. If any of this appeals to you, I have what you need to get started in this format.

Those of you that know me personally will know that normally I’m only into competitive Magic. Playing for high stakes, making meaningful decisions and doing the best you can to win just has something very special to it and so it was no surprise that I didn’t really play Commander a whole lot. That was until another Cardmarket writer, Thoralf “Toffel” Severin, introduced me to competitive 1v1 Commander - a format that has since grown on me and that I'd like to introduce today.

Commander has a weird history on Magic Online since most players prefer playing it in paper. Last year Wizards decided to split things up into Multiplayer “normal” Commander and the competitive 1v1 Commander. For the latter, they introduced Leagues and the weekly Commander Challenge Event on Saturday where the winner receives 100 Treasure Chests and a full set of the most recent Standard legal set, which leads to fierce competition.

So, let’s get to it, what is 1v1 Commander? It doesn’t differ too much from regular Commander, your Deck consists of 99 cards and a single legendary creature which starts in your Command Zone for you to cast. Every time that creature would leave the battlefield you have the option to put it back into the Command Zone instead, costing two more generic mana the next time you cast it. Both you and your opponent start at 30 life, but taking 21 combat damage from a single Commander will also kill you, no matter your life total.

As for deckbuilding, you’re only allowed to play cards within your Commander’s color identity and except for basic lands you can’t include multiples of a card in your deck. There’s also a banlist that is constantly monitored by Wizards which keeps the most broken cards from ruining the fun for everyone.

With the rules introduced, let’s now check out the gameplay of 1v1 Commander: how do Commanders, 30 life and singleton decks impact competitive play?

30 life

Someone has probably told you “Life is a resource” at some point while teaching you something about Magic. This statement is very true and many cards like Fire Covenant, Sylvan Library, or Ancient Tomb are powerful in Commander only because you have 30 life to play with. Another side-effect of the high starting life is that pure beatdown or burn decks don’t really exist. Obviously, there are aggressive decks but those don’t only pressure your life total, they also get ahead on cards and disrupt your game plan.

Fire Covenant Sylvan Library Ancient Tomb

An important note on life: just because you have 30 life doesn’t mean that you can sit around doing nothing, hoping to win with your hard-cast six-drop. You still have to play efficient cards that answer opponent’s threats or take over the game on your own.

Commanders

Having one (or two with the Partner ability) creatures in your command zone is an amazing resource! It’s basically another card in your starting hand that never truly dies to removal. This extra card makes card advantage easy to come by, especially creatures with the Partner ability like Thrasios, Triton Hero, Tymna, the Weaver, or Kraum, Ludevic’s Opus generate a lot of value (if only by being two additional resources to play with).

Tymna the Weaver Kraum, Ludevics Opus

Another major advantage you can get from your commander is in the consistency of always having access to it. If your deck involves a combo with your commander, you never have to get lucky drawing it, it’s just there. A simple example of the power of a Commander was a Zurgo Bellstriker deck I once played. It was a Mono Red Burn deck, but it didn’t have to play any bad one-drops because it could always play Zurgo on one. While that wasn’t really a combo, another example would be Leovold, Emissary of Trest decks, which often run Timetwister effects since they are absurdly powerful with Leovold on the board. Your Commander is the most consistent part of all the games you play in this singleton format, so keep that in mind while building a deck.

Singleton Decks

The biggest constraint while building a Commander deck is definitely the singleton-rule. In competitive Magic, you streamline your decks as much as possible as you want consistency in game play. So, your Elves decks in Modern doesn’t only play one “Collected Company”, it plays four to maximize the chances of drawing it. In 1v1 Commander, to make up for the lack of multiples, you play slightly worse versions of cards to have the same consistency. If you play a Ramp deck you should not only play Llanowar Elves, you’ll also play Fyndhorn Elves, Utopia Sprawl, Wild Growth, Search for Tomorrow, and Exploration.

If you look into playing Leovold, you will not only play Thoughtseize when Duress, Inquisition of Kozilek, and Blackmail are also available. The way to work around a singleton restriction is plain and simple: play different versions of similar effects to ensure consistency in gameplay.

LLanowar Elves Fyndhorn Elves

Bruse Tarl, Boorish Herder // Thrasios, Triton Hero

As an example deck, I’ll go over this decklist that won a recent 1v1 Commander challenge on Magic Online. First up, we’ll have to look at the Commanders: Thrasios, Triton Hero is excellent at using excess mana to generate card and/or mana advantage. To me, Bruse Tarl, Boorish Herder is very much the defining Commander of this deck though, as he can deliver the beats quickly. On his own he attacks for six Commander damage with lifelink which is terribly hard to race but he’s also good against removal since his trigger can target creatures other than himself.

As for the 98 cards in the actual deck (98 only because we have two Commanders), the deck consists of the best green mana dorks, blue counter spells, white/red removal spells, and some value creatures in all of those colors.

Mana-generating creatures are insanely powerful here as you can never have too much mana, especially since mana burn was removes. If you do end up with extraneous mana, you can just activate Thrasios for more gas. Getting the mana-advantage over your opponent is very important in this deck’s “get ahead and stay ahead” game plan. As soon as you’ve built a board, you either go on the aggressive with Bruse Tarl or you lock your opponent out with overwhelming card advantage generated by Jace, the Mind Sculptor, Palace Jailer, Umezawa's Jitte, or Sword of Feast and Famine.

Counter spells are great at preventing your opponent from catching up. Most of them are cheap enough to enable two actions a turn. Ravages of War and Armageddon simply win the game as soon as you’re ahead on board.

This deck plays like butter when ahead, which might give you a hint of its weakness: catching up is quite difficult. If your opponent is on the play and opens with Land, mana dork, untaps and kills your Noble Hierarch with an efficient removal spell, it’s going to be a tough road ahead. Cards like Counterspell, Abrade, and Council’s Judgement will always one for one with most cards but are unlikely to do more than that.

Overall this deck does a great job pushing its advantage, disrupting the opponent enough for them not to recover and gets most of its pressure from Bruse Tarl granting Double Strike to your attackers.

That’s it for the introduction, I hope this sparked your interest in the format. If you love singleton decks and play well enough, you might just win the weekly 1v1 Challenge on Magic Online and make those 100 Treasure Chests your own!

Thrasios/Bruse Decklist by Olivetti:

Thrasios, Triton Hero Bruse Tarl, Boorish Herder
Maindeck
37Lands 19Creatures 44Other Spells
1Adarkar Wastes 1Bruse Tarl, Boorish Herder 1Abrade
1Ancient Tomb 1Thrasios, Triton Hero 1Counterspell
1Arid Mesa 1Arbor Elf 1Daze
1Bloodstained Mire 1Avacyn's Pilgrim 1Evasive Action
1Botanical Sanctum 1Birds of Paradise 1Fact or Fiction
1Breeding Pool 1Bloom Tender 1Force of Will
1Brushland 1Boreal Druid 1Force Spike
1Cavern of Souls 1Courser of Kruphix 1Lightning Bolt
1City of Brass 1Elvish Mystic 1Logic Knot
1Command Tower 1Flametongue Kavu 1Mana Leak
1Flooded Strand 1Fyndhorn Elves 1Mana Tithe
1Forest 1Llanowar Elves 1Memory Lapse
1Hallowed Fountain 1Meddling Mage 1Mental Misstep
1Island 1Noble Hierarch 1Miscalculation
1Karplusan Forest 1Palace Jailer 1Mystic Confluence
1Mana Confluence 1Snapcaster Mage 1Negate
1Marsh Flats 1Stoneforge Mystic 1Pyroblast
1Misty Rainforest 1Tireless Tracker 1Red Elemental Blast
1Plateau 1Voice of Resurgence 1Remand
1Polluted Delta 1Spell Pierce
1Razorverge Thicket 1Spell Snare
1Sacred Foundry 1Swords to Plowshares
1Savannah 1Ancestral Vision
1Scalding Tarn 1Armageddon
1Shivan Reef 1Chain Lightning
1Steam Vents 1Council's Judgment
1Stomping Ground 1Flame Slash
1Taiga 1Gitaxian Probe
1Temple Garden 1Oust
1Tropical Island 1Ravages of War
1Tundra 1Steelshaper's Gift
1Verdant Catacombs 1Chrome Mox
1Volcanic Island 1Mox Diamond
1Wasteland 1Smuggler's Copter
1Windswept Heath 1Sword of Feast and Famine
1Wooded Foothills 1Umezawa's Jitte
1Yavimaya Coast 1Winter Orb
1Dack Fayden
1Jace, the Mind Sculptor
1Detention Sphere
1Search for Azcanta / Azcanta, the Sunken Ruin
1Sylvan Library
1Utopia Sprawl
1Wild Growth

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and not necessarily Cardmarket.

5 Comments

jack(2018-04-18 13:44)

@aven yeah, the whole banlist thing was unfortunate timing, new banlist came out while this article was in the editing. I myself am currently looking into acquiring a paper 1v1 commander (with the magic online banlist) to play at gp sideevents (cfb started doing them and i'd looove playing this format in paper). If there's a chance for that, i'd also play it at my lgs, probably have to look into that :)

jack(2018-04-18 13:42)

@alex85 the banlist was updated very shortly after the article was written, i found out shortly after. The powerlevel of those moxen (and the other cards that got banned) was very high and i'm excited for the format without them now. . .

hasepase(2018-04-18 13:40)

Looking at the ban list history of this format you can see the mtgo 1v1 commander is replaying all the experiences which the french duel commander community already had. This is such an ill-considered format that seems to completely refuse to learn from the biggest competitive 1v1 commander community(french). Its almost like a spit in the face for everyone who played duel commander before the mtgo guys created this new format. They even thought at first strip mine was an acceptable card. Why not just play french commander if you want to play a competitive commander format? Only because it isn't an ill-considered money grab trying to be a very half-assed idea between regular multiplayer and 1v1 commander that's only available at mtgo? ? ! ! !

alex85(2018-04-18 13:20)

Hi, is there any failure in the deck list as i found that ancient tomb and mox diamond are on the banned list for commander? ? ?

aVen(2018-04-18 13:15)

I love 1v1 commander and despise the normal multiplayer one. What interests me is which of the many 1v1 variants are actualy widely played in paper. Some, especially in the us, just play 1v1 with the multiplayer rules and banlist. So disgustingly awful! In my city (in poland) "leviathan" commander is king (30+ active players). I find it a much more finely and carefully crafted banlist than the mtgo one. And there's also french duelcommander (20hp), which i know gets some really big tournaments in europe.







So i'd love to see comments on which 1v1 commender versions do you see played around in your towns/stores.







Oh, and the article is a bit late, some cards like sylvan library and ancient tomb just got banned in mtgo 1v1 variant ;)

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