Edison: Goat's Younger Brother

We already covered the ever so popular Goat a while ago. This, however, is not the only historic Yu-Gi-Oh! format out there that still enjoys play to this day. The very small period in time that became known for the headline event of SJC Edison 2010 gave us one of the most diverse environments ever!


quickdraw dandy

What Is the Edison Format?

Edison was certainly a spark of brilliance just before the game drastically changed forever. The SJC (Shonen Jump Championship) in Edison was the last of its kind, before being renamed to YCS (Yu-Gi-Oh! Championship Series). This swan song of the SJC era left us with the largest event to date, housing a total of 2,175 participants. The legality of this format did not last, however, as The Shining Darkness released less than two weeks afterward. (Edison took place on April 24 and 25; Darkness dropped on May 7.)

It is hard to overstate how impactful The Shining Darkness was, introducing most of the Infernity cards like Infernity Barrier and Infernity Mirage. We also saw the arrival of powerhouses such as Herald of Perfection, Into the Void, and the meta threat of the X-Sabers, helmed by the beast that was XX-Saber Darksoul. However, before the game drastically changed, we got the perfect example of what the game was. If I had to take a snapshot of a moment in time to say, "Yeah, this is Yu-Gi-Oh!," I would choose SJC Edison.

The event was won by one of the game's most decorated players, Jeff Jones, piloting the deck known as "Quickdraw Dandywarrior." The name came from exploiting the interaction between Quickdraw Synchron and Dandylion to make powerful synchro plays. All of this came coupled with smaller combos such as Super-Nimble Mega Hamster with Ryko, Lightsworn Hunter or Lonefire Blossom into Tytannial, Princess of Camellias. The deck was basically an amalgamation of power cards and cool synergies, and it was damn good. Sounds powerful, huh? So most of the Top 16 was this deck, right? Well, no. This was one of the most diverse top cuts ever. Doomcaliber Gadgets, Caliber Cat, Flamvell, Gladiator Beast, Lightsworn, Machina, Blackwing, and many others made it feel like every deck in the game could be relevant.

Why Should You Play Edison?

Put simply, it's fun. Now, I've already made manifest my love for Goat format's slow, methodic gameplay. But Edison is so much more enjoyable to play. There are so, so many decks, and all of them are amazingly fun (other than burn, do not play burn). The format has something for everyone. And just like Goat, it has experienced a lot of evolution throughout the years after SJC Edison. Decks such as Diva Hero or Dragons either didn't exist or were barely experimented with. All this variety makes for a great experience since you can just pick whichever deck best fits your play style.


Dimensional Alchemist Evil HERO Dark Gaia Geartown
Even rogue decks have a shot at winning tournaments

But not only that, the format is also incredibly affordable, even more so than Goat, making it easily accessible for for all players. Decks don't have expensive staples like those in Goat format, such as Delinquent Duo, but cards which have been reprinted many times, like Upstart Goblin or Phoenix Wing Wind Blast. However, the format still has a couple of outliers which take up a decently big percentage of a deck's cost. Mist Wurm and Avenging Knight Parshath, for instance, haven't seen reprints in years, but are required by several decks of the format. Still, those are exceptions from the rule.

What's There to Play in Edison?

While I cannot feasibly cover every single deck viable in this format, I can still mention some of the most popular strategies it has to offer. We already discussed Quickdraw Dandywarrior, but let's talk about what else Edison has to show for itself.

Diva Hero:


Deep Sea Diva

Diva Hero is a deck which didn't exist at the time of SJC Edison 2010, but was developed during the modern era. As the name implies, this deck makes use of Deep Sea Diva in tandem with powerful HERO cards like Elemental HERO Stratos, Destiny HERO - Malicious, and Elemental HERO Absolute Zero. As it turns out, using a pre-errata Future Fusion (back when it sent the materials on activation) together with Miracle Fusion to get a turn one Absolute Zero, backed up by cards like Trap Dustshoot or Stardust Dragon, is pretty damn good.

Blackwings:


Black Whirlwind

There are two Blackwing variants in this format, but the most popular and successful is Vayu Turbo. Again, as the name implies, the deck exploits Blackwing - Vayu the Emblem of Honor to pump out Blackwing Armor Master or Blackwing Armed Wing every turn, backed by a ton of trap cards. Contrary to modern Blackwing builds, Vayu Turbo feels more like a stun deck at times, often maining Fossil Dyna Pachycephalo and other floodgates, one of which we'll discuss later.

Lightsworn:


Charge of the Light Brigade

Although hit after their total dominance, Lightsworns still prove a powerful threat, no questions asked. The amount of advantage you gain by resolving a Celestia, Lightsworn Angel is simply insane. Pair that up with how strong Ryko, Lightsworn Hunter is in a format where Nobleman of Crossout isn't played, and you get a recipe for disaster. Gaining advantage off of Solar Recharge into a board wipe, plus OTK (courtesy of Judgment Dragon) is always fun to do, even though this deck can be a tiny bit repetitive in my personal opinion.

Why Is Goat Still More Popular?

Well, with all the unfair stuff Goat has, it doesn't have Royal Oppression. This is one of the strongest floodgates ever made, and it kinda ruins the format. Yes, it's a one-of, and yes, it's double sided, but come on. We're already mad about Imperial Order being too unfair in current Yu-Gi-Oh!. One-of floodgates are just sacky and unfun, especially when they don't let anyone play like Oppression does.

Not only that, but Goat also has a larger and longer history than Edison, seeing more play since, well, forever. Goat is also better as a teaching tool for new players, with less obscure interactions, one of which I will always find hilarious. Basically, if you summon Colossal Fighter and Armory Arm, you win the game. No, seriously. The pre-errata text of Colossal Fighter made it so it could bring itself back every time it was destroyed. Pair that up with an Armory Arm equipped to an opponent's monster, and you could crash your Colossal Fighter an infinite amount of times, until your opponent died from the burn damage. Pretty funny, huh?

All in all, I still prefer Edison over Goat. This is the most Yu-Gi-Oh! the game has ever been. Simple, but complex; fun, but competitive. Not to mention the absolute beauties that are max-rarity Edison decks. Seriously— have you seen a full-rarity Diva Zombie deck? So yeah, with the news of Konami making events for past formats I wrote about in a previous article, you should probably give it a shot. I can assure you you'll have a great deal of fun.


Opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and not necessarily Cardmarket.



9 Comments

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aircraft33(12.05.2022 19:32)

I'd love to play this format, but it seems impossible to find any event at local games stores (I'm based in Italy). Can anyone help me?

Azdrerios(03.03.2022 18:17)

"Quickdraw Dandywarrior" has got to be the best name for any meta deck that's ever existed in this game.

Also... "Super-Nimble Mega Hamster". Need I say more?

Mr-NoName(16.02.2022 10:58)

Royal Oppression was not a one-of, it was at 2 this format.

Lorek(15.02.2022 20:30)

I personally picked up on the format last year. It really feels like how Yu-Gi-Oh! In it´s core was made to play. It is a really nice sweet spot between GOAT format and the modern version of the game. The playspeed of the games is just perfect and you have many things to wrap your head around. Especially when you have never played in this era before.
For beginners I would definitely consider playing this after GOAT to learn a more advanced playstyle and figure out some archetypes and combos.

Calista(15.02.2022 12:48)

Love this format. I usually just gentleman into not playing Royal Oppression, similar to how you may opt not to play with Vanity's Emptiness or Imperial Order in other old formats.

DrFries(15.02.2022 04:32)

Actually it wasnt the biggest one,the biggest event was 2012 Long Beach

gsus6(15.02.2022 12:17)

DrFries he said the largest "to date".

Calista(15.02.2022 12:50)

I can see how this would be misunderstood, but the point is that SJC Edison was bigger than any event that came before it.

vaperror(15.02.2022 00:12)

100% agree.. Such a nice format

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